About

My name is Michael McKeown. I am currently a PhD candidate at Princeton University in the Electrical Engineering Department. I work with Professor David Wentzlaff, focusing on Computer Architecture. My primary research emphasis is energy-efficiency in data center processors, looking specifically at methods for deduplicating computation to optimize throughput/energy.  However, I am generally interested in rethinking future data centers, which scale massively at both the core, chip, and server-level, for high efficiency and consistent performance to support the growing demand on cloud computing and cloud-based services (i.e. IaaS, PaaS, SaaS).

I recently received a MA from Princeton University in Electrical Engineering and received my BS in Computer Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).  While at UCSB, I did undergraduate research in electronic design automation (EDA) and computer arithmetic.  I also interned for two summers and one quarter as a software engineer at TrueVision Systems, a company based in Santa Barbara that builds 3D visualization and guidance systems for surgical applications.  My first two summers at UCSB I worked as an Orientation Staff member, welcoming new students and advising them on university-related subjects.

I am originally from San Marino, CA, a small town next to Pasadena, CA.  My father was a physics professor at Caltech up until a few years ago, where I had the privilege of working as an assistant in his lab during high school.  While my parents have since moved to Virginia, I still have many good friends in the area and try to visit often.  I also have an amazing older sister, Kaitlyn, who currently lives in California with her furry companion, Prince Caspian.

In my free time I enjoy playing golf, dabbling in guitar, traveling, enjoying the outdoors, taking cool photographs (all the photos on this site are my own), and hanging with friends and family.  I am also a bit of a hobbyist and enjoy messing around with embedded hardware and software, sensors, FPGA’s, etc.  I am currently working on a quadcopter project, building the control board myself with high hopes for very cool features in the future (still in the early/prototyping stages).